Is a Movement Afoot to Eliminate the Performance Review?

I'm not one for hand-wringing about the latest people management or career development fad. For instance, I couldn't disagree more with bloggers who say a résumé—even a CEO résumé—shouldn't exceed one page. I've never used the word poppycock, but to them I say: poppycock!

But one of the people management ideas emerging recently is that of basically nixing the annual performance review. And let's admit it; annual performance reviews are a headache for everyone involved. Sometimes (often?) overdue or overlooked. 

Three days ago, I caught Liz Wright's less than subtle Fortune.com article: "Five Stupid Rules That Drive Great Employees Away." Rule #2 on Liz' list: insulting performance review processes. Follow Liz on Forbes or LinkedIn, if you don't already. Her ideas are worth consideration.

Here's a snippet of her recent Forbes article:

Forbes contributor Liz Wright suggests that the performance review process is passé.

Forbes contributor Liz Wright suggests that the performance review process is passé.

Then yesterday, a member of the SHRM (Society for Human Resource Management) list on LinkedIn posed this question: 

LinkedIn Groups question to SHRM members about the relevance of performance reviews.

LinkedIn Groups question to SHRM members about the relevance of performance reviews.

Evidence of this question abounds with just a few Google searches. Indeed, Lisa Quast—another Forbes.com contributor—penned "How to Make Performance Reviews Relevant" in 2013, in which she wrote: 

Forbes contributor Lisa Quast reveals a possible harbinger on the topic in a January 2013 article. 

Forbes contributor Lisa Quast reveals a possible harbinger on the topic in a January 2013 article. 

Interesting: when I reached this point in this post, I googled "organizations ditching performance reviews," and folks, we may have a movement afoot. 

Facing a Search Committee Interview? Here's How to Prepare

The simplicity of this article about preparing for a search committee interview is deceptive. (And wonderful.) And I'm not saying it just because I used to work for The Alexander Group.

Jane Howze shares "How to Ace a Search Committee Interview" in Taglines Magazine.

Jane Howze shares "How to Ace a Search Committee Interview" in Taglines Magazine.

If you've never faced a search committee interview, but might do so in the next few years, take Jane's wisdom in Acing a Search Committee Interview to heart.

Learn it, practice it. You'll be glad you prepared.

New York Times Reports on LinkedIn Development for Tomorrow's Leaders

If eighty percent of jobs are found through one's network—and we recently saw that even board seats follow the same 80/20 rule—then it stands to reason that one should start thinking about networking early.

For tomorrow's leaders still in school, it's not too soon to build a great LinkedIn profile, and the July 31 New York Times article Finding a Career in LinkedIn Profiles is a good start.

I can only imagine how rich and deep those networks will be in 10-20 years. Many of my own friends cite their college relationships as being the foundation for many of the career moves they've made over the past 20 years. 

A screenshot of LinkedIn.edu. Massive content and data.

A screenshot of LinkedIn.edu. Massive content and data.