Overlooking the Obvious After Taking a New Job

Sometime things are so obvious we miss them entirely. 

That's what happened this year when a client's new job was mentioned on Fortune.com. His LinkedIn profile had worked like a charm, and his executive résumé and other materials were there to support his candidacy for the right company.

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Ready for a new step in your career? Are you sure? Start finding out using Jared Redick's Job Description Analysis.

Turns out, he was that company's purple squirrel.

But when Fortune announced his new role, guess who was still championing his OLD company on LinkedIn! 

Noticing all of this while vacationing, I emailed him and said, "Pull down your summary ASAP!" 

I know he was swamped with interviews, negotiations, press, and the whirlwind of settling into a new high profile role. But imagine what people thought when they cross-references him between the Fortune article and his LinkedIn profile. 

When you get a new job—especially if you've been conducting a long, intentional stealth job search—be sure your entire online brand quickly aligns with your new role before it's announced.

LinkedIn is a powerful tool for doing business. Yes, LinkedIn serves your long-term stealth job search, but don't forget that it also serves your every day work life.